Tweasily Avoidable

This past lecture in J2150 may have been the most useful one of this year. I’m not saying lecture hasn’t been important up to this point, but most of what was taught has already been learned by the students, at least in J2150H.

That said, I knew the dangers of social media and that everyone needs to be careful of what they’re posting. People have been telling me that for years, but in Monday’s lecture, I was told some cold, hard, facts about what posts on social media could lead to.

91% of potential employers look at an applicant’s social media pages before the actual interview, and 68% hired an applicant because of what they saw. I found a bevy of other stats from a blog that backed up a lot of what was said at lecture. It was from a year ago, so it may not be totally up to date.

The world is changing, employers want creative, innovative minds in their company and they can use networks like Twitter to find out if the applicant has one of those minds.

However, social media can also get an applicant in trouble. I don’t remember the exact statistic from lecture but it was north of 50% of employers choose not to hire because of a tasteless post on Twitter.

There is an option to set your Twitter and Facebook account to private, but what is really the point of that. I mean, you can be cool and funny to just your friends, but no one else can appreciate your wit. Especially for us as journalist, setting our accounts to private not only doesn’t serve a purpose, but prevents us from maximizing views on our work.

These are Ron Davis's current twitter privacy settings on Saturday, Mar. 21, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Davis chooses to not make his account private because it would limit his audience to view his work.
These are Ron Davis’s current twitter privacy settings on Saturday, Mar. 21, 2015 in Columbia, Mo. Davis chooses to not make his account private because it would limit his audience to view his work.

This is my first year in the journalism program, and I’ll admit that I’ve put some things I’m not proud of on social media. Since I’ve switched over, I’ve really cleaned up my act by boring and annoying all of my followers and friends with sports articles that I’ve written.

It’s doubtful that they’ll appreciate and even look at my content, but a future employer might.I’d rather have my social media filled with work that I’m proud of doing, not tasteless cracks I can make at the expense of others.

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